Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Ethiopia: Citizen Diplomacy for GERD, Nile Water Negotiations

Addis Ababa (HAN) September 10. 2020. Monitoring Regional Issues. Ethiopia needs to effectively make use of citizen diplomacy to make its side of the story heard and harness the benefits in the negotiation of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) and Nile waters talk.

Endale Nigusse, Diplomacy and International Relations Lecturer at Civil Service University told The Ethiopian Herald that ever since the establishment of the League of Nations, diplomacy has been transferred from bilateral to that of multilateral one.

“Here, government organizations, NGOs as well as individual citizens participate in diplomacy. Then public diplomacy comes. Particularly, after the end of the cold war, public diplomacy was widely used,” he said.

As to the lecturer, in public diplomacy, all citizens are considered owners of a national issue. As the world’s politics is vast and dynamic, the government alone could not be effective in handling diplomacy.

Before the reform, Ethiopian diplomacy focused only on investment, Endale went on to say. “In addition, as it was established on a network, the diplomacy was sick. It did not represent the country and its citizens as it used to voice the voice of the ruling party.”

Since the start of the reform, the major change in the diplomatic sphere is that it becomes citizen-centered. Now it is the citizens who are the ambassadors of their country. “If each and every citizen does not actively take part in the diplomatic life, it would be impossible for the country to get rid of poverty and backwardness,” Endale said.

During GERD’s negotiation, Egypt has been trying to make Ethiopia appear bad by portraying as if all its intentions are meant to monopolize the Nile waters. “Egyptians went as far as claiming that they are the sources of the Nile and they have been making a lot of propaganda to shape the mentality of their people.”

This, as to Endale, is the result of lack of strong tradition of public diplomacy on the Ethiopian side in the past. But since recent times, things have started to change.

Despite the differences in ideology, the majority of Ethiopians at home and aboard stood together in harmony when it comes to the issue of GERD. This shows that Ethiopians could play an important role in public diplomacy when it comes to key issues of national interest.

Investors, Ethiopian lovers and citizens are now acting in the front line to undertake effective public diplomacy.

Had the country adopted a better diplomatic approach earlier, it would have been able to convince its neighbours the fact that it doesn’t have any intention to harm their interests by constructing GERD.

Citing the Nobel award, green legacy, the contribution of the country to African countries in the fight against COVID-19 and other good deeds, he said, there is a lot of room for citizens to engage in effective public diplomacy.

Public diplomacy will have a huge impact on regional issues considering the fact that Ethiopians share a lot of cultural and linguistic similarities with their neighbours. Further, as Ethiopia has a large number of populations overseas, the Diaspora could do a lot in the public diplomacy podium, he underlined.

Sultan Kassim, a law lecturer at Haromaya University said what differs citizen diplomacy from formal diplomacy is that ordinary citizens are active participants in the former. “Citizens play a key role in building the image of their country and protecting the country’s interests.”

During GERD’s negotiations, besides promoting Ethiopia’s stance, Ethiopians could play a constructive role through public diplomacy by presenting the fact that Ethiopia does not have any intention of harming the interests of lower riparian countries by constructing the Dam and creating trust among the peoples of the basin. “Public diplomacy could play a key role in clearing various misconceptions.”

Compared with the experiences of other countries, citizen diplomacy has not been properly utilized in Ethiopia and as GERD negotiations clearly showed it is time to change this fact. “In doing so, we have to be able to plan citizen diplomacy with a purpose in mind.”

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On New England Soil, Somali Bantu Refugees Reclaim A Farming Tradition

By BEN JAMES Hassan Aden, at right, of Enfield, Connecticut, in May 2020 with family members, in the field he farms in Northampton, Massachusetts.BEN JAMES / NEPM I first met Hassan Aden last spring. My farm in Northampton, Massachusetts, sits right next to the half-acre plot that Aden and his family began working in May. In previous years, more than a few growers had given up on this fertile but monstrously weedy field. By July, I knew Aden was different. Standing next to an okra plant almost as tall as he was, Aden pointed at the surrounding crops. “Green pepper, hot pepper, tomato, corn, basil,” he said. “Those are all okra. Watermelon, green beans on the other side.”  Aden lives in Enfield, Connecticut, where he works full time for a halal food distributor. He also farms a field in West Springfield, Massachusetts. The vegetables he’s growing are mostly for his family — he has a freezer full of corn, tomatoes and other vegetables at home. But Aden also aims to make at least part of his income off the land.  Aden is Somali Bantu, part of an ethnic minority who, during the 19th century, were forcibly brought to Somalia as slaves. During the 1991 Somali civil war, Aden’s family was driven from their land to refugee camps in Kenya. In 2005, Aden was part of a major wave of Somali Bantu refugees who resettled in the United States. It says a lot about Aden that he’s willing to drive up and down I-91 in order to plant, weed and harvest his own fields. It also says a lot about how hard it is to find affordable farmland in New England. Hassan Aden next to his corn in Northampton, Massachusetts, in July 2020.CREDIT BEN JAMES / NEPM Aden is not alone in seeking workable land. Although many New England farms depend on migrant labor, immigrants face numerous barriers to starting their own farms. “When I started, I didn’t know how farmers without resources were going to get access to land,” said Hannah Spare, director of the organization All Farmers. Through partnerships with land trusts, municipal governments, and worker collectives, All Farmers helps immigrant and refugee farmers find land, like Aden’s plot in Northampton. They also teamed up with the Pioneer Valley Workers’ Center to help start the immigrant-led Riguezas del Campo farm in Hatfield. All Farmers supports Bhutanese, Latin American, East African and other immigrant communities in the region, including 40 Somali Bantu families. Spare said farming is at the core of how many Somali Bantus define themselves. “When they introduce themselves, they say, like, my name is so and so… I’m a farmer,” she said.    Aden has been farming since he was five. It was the kids’ job to scare away pests from the corn. “There’s so much monkeys,” he said. “Someone have to stay in the field day or night.”   Aden said the kids slept on top of sheds to protect themselves from lions and hyenas. When squads of monkeys arrived, the children ran noisily into the fields.  Now that Aden’s back to farming at 33, he said he’s regained a part of himself. “I feel good,” he said. “I feel healthy.”  Aden’s father, Ibrahim Abdule, also recently resumed farming after decades away from the soil. All Farmers helped him acquire a plot in Hatfield. “My father is 74 years old right now,” Aden said, laughing. “And he’s still farming. Yeah, he looks sharp. He looks like a 55-years-old-guy.”  Ibrahim Abdule displays traditional Somali Bantu dishes made from corn grown in western Massachusetts.CREDIT BEN JAMES / NEPM Corn is at the center of Somali Bantu culture. In early October, the harvest mostly complete, I met Aden and his father in Enfield. Alternating between English and his native Maay Maay, Abdule displayed a half-dozen dishes made from corn grown in Hatfield and Northampton. Among them was “soor,” a Somali staple made from boiled kernels of mature corn. Other dishes included corn combined with beans and — Abdule searched for the word, speaking briefly in Maay Maay with his son before turning back to say it — pumpkin.  The plots of land father and son now farm not only tie them to tradition. Abdule said they also offer a chance for the family to become less dependent on government services. “Now we are in the state system,” Abdule said. “But my vision is to leave the state [services] to get enough food from my farm.” Abdule shook his head. “We don’t need to — ‘Give me some, give me some.’ Yeah, that is no good,” he said.  A crucial step toward that independence came this fall at the new Brightwood Farmers Market in Springfield, which ran for four Saturdays in September and October. The market was created for immigrant farmers to serve immigrant communities. Rumbila Abdullahi, the market manager, is Somali Bantu and a senior majoring in chemistry at Smith College. She said the farmers on opening day were thrilled. “They’re so excited,” she said, “putting all their vegetables on their tables, going to each other, talking to each other, like, ‘Finally, we got a way to sell our stuff. It feels like back home.’”  The market, which will resume next year, had no vendor fees, and farmers didn’t need to register. Growers just showed up. They spoke Maay Maay, Spanish or KiSwahili. The market manager swiped customers’ food assistance, or SNAP, cards. And the market accepted HIP — or Healthy Incentive Program benefits. That’s up to $80 extra a month for vegetables for SNAP recipients.  Spare said HIP can be kind of complicated. “So to have someone who speaks your native language at the market being able to explain it to you, how to use your SNAP benefits to get HIP benefits, is huge,” she said. And five months after Aden and his family seeded corn and other crops in Northampton, he sold his produce at a farmers market for the first time. A customer examined Aden’s tomatoes. “Yeah, that’s good,” she said. “How much is it per bag of those?” “Gonna be $3,” Aden replied. “That’s gonna be SNAP, right?” The next day, Aden was back in Northampton. “Corn is happy, the tomato is happy,” he said. “All of them happy. Yeah, yeah, I am happy.”   Aden dreams of a bigger farm — at least 20 acres shared by the regional Somali Bantu community. At that moment, however, he simply surveyed his half-acre field, making plans for where he’d plant his corn next year.  Source: New England Public Media

Xildhibaanada Baarlamaanka 2aad Hirshabelle oo lagu xirey lacag si loo siiyo Kaarka Aqoonsiga

Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin LINE Guddiga farsamada soo xulista baarlamaanka 2aad ee Hirshabelle ayaa ku xirey lacag in ay helaan kaarka aqoonsiga xildhibaanada baarlamaanka 2aad ee Hirshabelle. Wararka ka imanaya magaalada Jowhar ayaa sheegaya in xildhibaan walba oo xalay lagu dhowaaqay in lagu xirey lacag gaareysa $500 “Shan Boqol oo dollar” in uu ku shubo akaawn uu furtay guddiga farsamada soo xulista baarlamaanka Hirshabelle. Qaar ka mid ah xildhibaanada baarlamaanka labaad ayay ku noqotay layaab in lagu xiro lacag maadaama ay duubabkooda ay u gudbiyeen dhammaan waxyaalihii loogaga baahnaa. Arrintan ayaa timid kadib markii saaka ay tageen xarunta guddiga farsamada xildhibaanadii lagu dhowaaqay loona sheegay inay bixiyaan lacagtaas. Xildhibaanadii dib u soo laabtay ayaa sheegay inaysan hore u jirin lacago ay hore ugu bixiyeen inay qaataan aqoonsiga xildhibaanimada sanadkii 2016. Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin LINE Previous articleMadaxweynihii hore ee Soomaaliya Shariif Sheekh Axmed oo dalka dib ugu soo laabtay

Sheekh Shariif oo Muqdisho ku laabtay, Dalab Culusna u diray Hay’adaha Amniga Dowladda Somaliya

Madaxweynihii hore ee Soomaaliya, ahna hoggaaminaya Madasha Qaran ee Xisbiyada mucaaradka ayaa maanta ku laabtay magaalada Muqdisho, kadib muddo laba bilood ah oo uu ku maqnaa Imaaraadka Carabta, kadibma soo maray dalka Kenya. Isagoo xaruntiisa kula hadlayey taageerayaal soo dhoweeyay ayuu sheegay inay wax lada xumaado tahay xaaladda Amniga caasimadda oo dadku aysan Caruurtoodii banaanka u bixi karin cabsi laga qabo in la afduubto oo xubnahooda la iibsado, iyadoo markii hore ay jiray cabsi amni oo ku saabsan Alshabaab. Ad ‘Hay’adaha Amniga waxaan ugu baaqeynaa inay shaqadooda qabsadaan oo waajibaadkoodu gutaan, kuna mashquulin shaqooyinka aan loogu talogelin..” ayuu yiri Sheekh Shariif oo sidoo kale ka hadlay dhibaatooyinka kufsiga ee soo noqnoqday. Sheekh Shariif ayaan soo hadal qaadin arrimaha doorashooyinka iyo siyaasadda, isagoo muddo dheer ka maqnaa caasimadda. Warar Xul ah

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On New England Soil, Somali Bantu Refugees Reclaim A Farming Tradition

By BEN JAMES Hassan Aden, at right, of Enfield, Connecticut, in May 2020 with family members, in the field he farms in Northampton, Massachusetts.BEN JAMES / NEPM I first met Hassan Aden last spring. My farm in Northampton, Massachusetts, sits right next to the half-acre plot that Aden and his family began working in May. In previous years, more than a few growers had given up on this fertile but monstrously weedy field. By July, I knew Aden was different. Standing next to an okra plant almost as tall as he was, Aden pointed at the surrounding crops. “Green pepper, hot pepper, tomato, corn, basil,” he said. “Those are all okra. Watermelon, green beans on the other side.”  Aden lives in Enfield, Connecticut, where he works full time for a halal food distributor. He also farms a field in West Springfield, Massachusetts. The vegetables he’s growing are mostly for his family — he has a freezer full of corn, tomatoes and other vegetables at home. But Aden also aims to make at least part of his income off the land.  Aden is Somali Bantu, part of an ethnic minority who, during the 19th century, were forcibly brought to Somalia as slaves. During the 1991 Somali civil war, Aden’s family was driven from their land to refugee camps in Kenya. In 2005, Aden was part of a major wave of Somali Bantu refugees who resettled in the United States. It says a lot about Aden that he’s willing to drive up and down I-91 in order to plant, weed and harvest his own fields. It also says a lot about how hard it is to find affordable farmland in New England. Hassan Aden next to his corn in Northampton, Massachusetts, in July 2020.CREDIT BEN JAMES / NEPM Aden is not alone in seeking workable land. Although many New England farms depend on migrant labor, immigrants face numerous barriers to starting their own farms. “When I started, I didn’t know how farmers without resources were going to get access to land,” said Hannah Spare, director of the organization All Farmers. Through partnerships with land trusts, municipal governments, and worker collectives, All Farmers helps immigrant and refugee farmers find land, like Aden’s plot in Northampton. They also teamed up with the Pioneer Valley Workers’ Center to help start the immigrant-led Riguezas del Campo farm in Hatfield. All Farmers supports Bhutanese, Latin American, East African and other immigrant communities in the region, including 40 Somali Bantu families. Spare said farming is at the core of how many Somali Bantus define themselves. “When they introduce themselves, they say, like, my name is so and so… I’m a farmer,” she said.    Aden has been farming since he was five. It was the kids’ job to scare away pests from the corn. “There’s so much monkeys,” he said. “Someone have to stay in the field day or night.”   Aden said the kids slept on top of sheds to protect themselves from lions and hyenas. When squads of monkeys arrived, the children ran noisily into the fields.  Now that Aden’s back to farming at 33, he said he’s regained a part of himself. “I feel good,” he said. “I feel healthy.”  Aden’s father, Ibrahim Abdule, also recently resumed farming after decades away from the soil. All Farmers helped him acquire a plot in Hatfield. “My father is 74 years old right now,” Aden said, laughing. “And he’s still farming. Yeah, he looks sharp. He looks like a 55-years-old-guy.”  Ibrahim Abdule displays traditional Somali Bantu dishes made from corn grown in western Massachusetts.CREDIT BEN JAMES / NEPM Corn is at the center of Somali Bantu culture. In early October, the harvest mostly complete, I met Aden and his father in Enfield. Alternating between English and his native Maay Maay, Abdule displayed a half-dozen dishes made from corn grown in Hatfield and Northampton. Among them was “soor,” a Somali staple made from boiled kernels of mature corn. Other dishes included corn combined with beans and — Abdule searched for the word, speaking briefly in Maay Maay with his son before turning back to say it — pumpkin.  The plots of land father and son now farm not only tie them to tradition. Abdule said they also offer a chance for the family to become less dependent on government services. “Now we are in the state system,” Abdule said. “But my vision is to leave the state [services] to get enough food from my farm.” Abdule shook his head. “We don’t need to — ‘Give me some, give me some.’ Yeah, that is no good,” he said.  A crucial step toward that independence came this fall at the new Brightwood Farmers Market in Springfield, which ran for four Saturdays in September and October. The market was created for immigrant farmers to serve immigrant communities. Rumbila Abdullahi, the market manager, is Somali Bantu and a senior majoring in chemistry at Smith College. She said the farmers on opening day were thrilled. “They’re so excited,” she said, “putting all their vegetables on their tables, going to each other, talking to each other, like, ‘Finally, we got a way to sell our stuff. It feels like back home.’”  The market, which will resume next year, had no vendor fees, and farmers didn’t need to register. Growers just showed up. They spoke Maay Maay, Spanish or KiSwahili. The market manager swiped customers’ food assistance, or SNAP, cards. And the market accepted HIP — or Healthy Incentive Program benefits. That’s up to $80 extra a month for vegetables for SNAP recipients.  Spare said HIP can be kind of complicated. “So to have someone who speaks your native language at the market being able to explain it to you, how to use your SNAP benefits to get HIP benefits, is huge,” she said. And five months after Aden and his family seeded corn and other crops in Northampton, he sold his produce at a farmers market for the first time. A customer examined Aden’s tomatoes. “Yeah, that’s good,” she said. “How much is it per bag of those?” “Gonna be $3,” Aden replied. “That’s gonna be SNAP, right?” The next day, Aden was back in Northampton. “Corn is happy, the tomato is happy,” he said. “All of them happy. Yeah, yeah, I am happy.”   Aden dreams of a bigger farm — at least 20 acres shared by the regional Somali Bantu community. At that moment, however, he simply surveyed his half-acre field, making plans for where he’d plant his corn next year.  Source: New England Public Media

Xildhibaanada Baarlamaanka 2aad Hirshabelle oo lagu xirey lacag si loo siiyo Kaarka Aqoonsiga

Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin LINE Guddiga farsamada soo xulista baarlamaanka 2aad ee Hirshabelle ayaa ku xirey lacag in ay helaan kaarka aqoonsiga xildhibaanada baarlamaanka 2aad ee Hirshabelle. Wararka ka imanaya magaalada Jowhar ayaa sheegaya in xildhibaan walba oo xalay lagu dhowaaqay in lagu xirey lacag gaareysa $500 “Shan Boqol oo dollar” in uu ku shubo akaawn uu furtay guddiga farsamada soo xulista baarlamaanka Hirshabelle. Qaar ka mid ah xildhibaanada baarlamaanka labaad ayay ku noqotay layaab in lagu xiro lacag maadaama ay duubabkooda ay u gudbiyeen dhammaan waxyaalihii loogaga baahnaa. Arrintan ayaa timid kadib markii saaka ay tageen xarunta guddiga farsamada xildhibaanadii lagu dhowaaqay loona sheegay inay bixiyaan lacagtaas. Xildhibaanadii dib u soo laabtay ayaa sheegay inaysan hore u jirin lacago ay hore ugu bixiyeen inay qaataan aqoonsiga xildhibaanimada sanadkii 2016. Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin LINE Previous articleMadaxweynihii hore ee Soomaaliya Shariif Sheekh Axmed oo dalka dib ugu soo laabtay

Sheekh Shariif oo Muqdisho ku laabtay, Dalab Culusna u diray Hay’adaha Amniga Dowladda Somaliya

Madaxweynihii hore ee Soomaaliya, ahna hoggaaminaya Madasha Qaran ee Xisbiyada mucaaradka ayaa maanta ku laabtay magaalada Muqdisho, kadib muddo laba bilood ah oo uu ku maqnaa Imaaraadka Carabta, kadibma soo maray dalka Kenya. Isagoo xaruntiisa kula hadlayey taageerayaal soo dhoweeyay ayuu sheegay inay wax lada xumaado tahay xaaladda Amniga caasimadda oo dadku aysan Caruurtoodii banaanka u bixi karin cabsi laga qabo in la afduubto oo xubnahooda la iibsado, iyadoo markii hore ay jiray cabsi amni oo ku saabsan Alshabaab. Ad ‘Hay’adaha Amniga waxaan ugu baaqeynaa inay shaqadooda qabsadaan oo waajibaadkoodu gutaan, kuna mashquulin shaqooyinka aan loogu talogelin..” ayuu yiri Sheekh Shariif oo sidoo kale ka hadlay dhibaatooyinka kufsiga ee soo noqnoqday. Sheekh Shariif ayaan soo hadal qaadin arrimaha doorashooyinka iyo siyaasadda, isagoo muddo dheer ka maqnaa caasimadda. Warar Xul ah

Lionel Messi Oo Go’aan Ka Gaadhay Mustaqbalkiisa Kadib Markii Uu Josep Bartomeu Is Casilay.

Xiddiga kooxda Barcelona ee Lionel Messi aya lagu soo waramayaa in uu ogolaaday in uu heshiis cusub u saxiixo kooxda Barcelona wixii ka dambeeya xilli ciyaareedkan. Xiddiga reer Argentine ayuu heshiiskiisu dhici doonaa xagaaga dambe waxana uu markii hore diiday in uu heshiis cusub u saxiixo kooxda isaga oo doonayay in uu isaga tago kooxda. Laakiin wargayska The Telegraph ayaa sheegaya in uu xiddiga Lionel Messi haatan ogolaan doono in uu heshiis cusub u saxixo kooxda kadib markii uu Jose Bartomeu iska casilay madaxtinimada kooxda. Madaxweynaha Bartomeu oo dhawaan ay isku dheceen Lionel Messi ayaa iska casilay jagada Madaxtinimo ee kooxda Barcelona.