Saturday, October 24, 2020

Lancaster author Omar Mohamed named finalist for National Book Award

Saturday October 24, 2020 A book co-written by a Lancaster author is a finalist for a National Book Award in the Young People's Literature category. “When Stars Are Scattered,” the debut book by Lancaster County-based Omar Mohammed is among five finalists in the category. Mohammed co-wrote the book with Newberry Honor-winning author Victoria Jamieson. Ads By Google The graphic novel, released with Penguin Random House in April, details Mohamed’s experience growing up in a refugee camp in Kenya. Mohamed and his brother spent 15 years in the camp without knowing if their mother was still alive. Reached by phone Wednesday morning, Mohamed said he was hopeful the honor would help the book reach more readers. “I’m excited and very happy with the news, because the books will reach more of an audience,” Mohamed said in a text message. “I know a lot of people are going to read and learn the real story about who these refugees are.” The National Book Awards selected 25 total finalists among five categories. The 25 National Book Award nominations were selected out of almost 1,700 submissions. Finalists receive $1,000 and the winner receives $10,000. The winner will be announced during a virtual ceremony on Nov. 18. Visit nationalbook.org to see a complete list of the finalists. advertisements   Al-Shabaab’s top leader transfers power amid factional strife - Jamestown Trump says Egypt may 'blow up' Ethiopia dam - Middle East Eye The invasive prosopis tree: turning a livelihood menace into a source of income in Somaliland - FAO UNDP’s new weather app helps Somali pastoralists - Borgen Mag Museveni commissions multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory - New Vision AMISOM hosts Somali Public Agenda to discuss Somalia’s 2020/2021 elections - AMISOM Somali chef Hawa Hassan tells stories of East African cuisine through the experts: grandmothers - Star Tribune Ahead of elections, UN urges that Somalia's political space remain open to all - UNSOM US embassy in Turkey warns of potential terror attack threat in Istanbul - CNN

Trump says Egypt may 'blow up' Ethiopia dam

Saturday October 24, 2020 US president made the remarks as he announced normalisation deal between Israel and Sudan US President Donald Trump announced on Friday a normalisation deal between Sudan and Israel (AFP) US President Donald Trump voiced anger at Ethiopia over its construction of a huge dam on the Nile River and suggested Egypt may destroy it. Trump made the remarks as he announced a normalisation deal between US ally Israel and Sudan, which like Egypt fears that Ethiopia will use up scarce water resources. "It's a very dangerous situation because Egypt is not going to be able to live that way," Trump told reporters in the Oval Office with leaders of Sudan and Israel on speakerphone. Ads By Google "They'll end up blowing up the dam. And I said it and I say it loud and clear - they'll blow up that dam. And they have to do something," Trump said. "They should have stopped it long before it started," Trump said, regretting that Egypt was in domestic tumult when the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam project began in 2011. Remarkably bluntly, Trump urges Sudanese leaders to help in resolving the Ethiopian Grand Renaissance Dam impasse, or Egypt “will end up blowing that dam” pic.twitter.com/ey0Phe0IlY — Mohamed Yehia (@yeh1a) October 23, 2020 Trump - a close ally of Egypt's general turned president, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi - had agreed to Cairo's pleas to mediate over the dam, with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin leading talks. The State Department said in September that it was cutting off aid to Ethiopia due to its decision to begin filling the dam despite not reaching an agreement with the downstream nations. "I had a deal done for them and then, unfortunately, Ethiopia broke the deal, which they should not have done. That was a big mistake," Trump said. "They will never see that money unless they adhere to that agreement," he said. Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan have been negotiating for nearly a decade to reach an agreement on outstanding issues related to the impact of the $4.6bn Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on their water security.  Ethiopia says the project is indispensable for its electrification and development needs and has voiced hope of beginning operations in early 2021. Egypt depends on the Nile for about 97 percent of its irrigation and drinking water and is concerned that the filling of the dam will exacerbate a water shortage crisis in the event of a prolonged drought.  Sudan, Ethiopia's northern neighbour, has concerns regarding the potential impact of the construction of the dam on its own dams, and for the safety of its population and farmland from flooding that could result from faults in the construction or operation of the GERD.  Sudan's Prime Minister Abdulla Hamdok, asked by Trump on speakerphone about the dam, voiced appreciation for US diplomacy and said his government wanted an "amicable solution soon" among the three countries. The speed of the filling of the dam will potentially have an immediate effect on Egypt. If it takes five years to fill the dam, it will reduce Egypt's water supply by 36 percent and destroy half of Egypt's farmland, according to the Egyptian government. advertisements   Al-Shabaab’s top leader transfers power amid factional strife - Jamestown Lancaster author Omar Mohamed named finalist for National Book Award - Lancaster Online The invasive prosopis tree: turning a livelihood menace into a source of income in Somaliland - FAO UNDP’s new weather app helps Somali pastoralists - Borgen Mag Museveni commissions multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory - New Vision AMISOM hosts Somali Public Agenda to discuss Somalia’s 2020/2021 elections - AMISOM Somali chef Hawa Hassan tells stories of East African cuisine through the experts: grandmothers - Star Tribune Ahead of elections, UN urges that Somalia's political space remain open to all - UNSOM US embassy in Turkey warns of potential terror attack threat in Istanbul - CNN

The invasive prosopis tree: turning a livelihood menace into a source of income in Somaliland

Saturday October 24, 2020 Prosopis julifora is a tree dreaded across the Horn of Africa. Prosopis has the ability to outcompete other trees and vegetation, deplete water sources and take over large areas, which would otherwise have been home to trees and vegetation preferred by local people. “This invasive species generates severe impacts. It is reducing the availability of grazing land, farming land, and water for both pastoral and agropastoral populations,” says Stella Keino, Natural Resource Management Associate for FAO in Somalia. The tree produces pods that livestock feed on when grazing. Although this contributes to nourishing animals, it also feeds the problem of prosopis spreading further. “Livestock consume the pods which are full seeds. These seeds remain intact in the animals’ digestive system and their droppings basically plant new generations of the tree wherever the animals move,” adds Keino. This includes livestock migration routes being blocked off by the spread of these fast-growing trees that form dense thickets and make passage very difficult. Ads By Google Because of its hardiness, thorns and aggressive nature, local people see prosopis mostly as a threat to livestock-related livelihoods. But the tables have now turned thanks to the United Nations Joint Programme on Youth Employment project called “Supporting communities in Somaliland to ‘make prosopis make money’ through cash for work and small business development”, funded by Sweden, Denmark and Italy. The project was implemented by FAO and the local non-governmental organization the Pastoral and Environmental Network in the Horn of Africa (PENHA) to create entrepreneurial and employment opportunities for vulnerable women and youth through the effective management and utilization of prosopis pods in Baki, Berbera, Burao and Odweyne districts of Somaliland. “Our research showed that processing pods into animal feed supplements and turning the trees into charcoal for domestic energy was a hidden opportunity to turn the prosopis menace into a valuable resource,” says Sadia Ahmed, PENHA country director. “Importantly, processing prosopis will also contribute to control its spread. When the pods are milled to produce feed, the crushed seeds no longer spread the tree,” added Sadia Ahmed. The project aimed to engage and uplift small-scale traders in the region through these innovative activities and establish livestock feed processing cooperatives. A valuable resource With the support of PENHA, FAO raised awareness on how the species can be turned into a valuable resource by providing training on its management and utilization. Hundreds of jobless women and youth were employed. They were provided with tools to manage the invading prosopis trees and earned money through the cash-for-work programme. People who used to see prosopis as a useless tree species that only displaced productive trees and vegetation, realized its many economic possibilities, and learned how to control its spread across vital grazing lands. “The project has helped many unemployed people like me by providing an income that we didn’t have before. Thanks to this activity, we were able to pay some debts here and there, and managed to purchase a few things,” says Abdullahi Abdi, one of the cash-for-work beneficiaries in Odweyne district. The laborious work carried out in the heat of the bush managed to reduce prosopis ground cover area by 2.1 km squared. This work has opened up space for other valuable vegetation preferred by local livestock. “We cleared the prosopis and now expect other trees to grow in its place. We would love to do it again so that we earn an income from it while we pave the way for other trees to grow,” says Abdullahi. In some areas, trees were uprooted and replaced by other non-invasive trees; in other areas such as rangelands, prosopis trees were cleared to allow grass to grow. Through the management and utilization of prosopis, the locals have also been able to spare other trees, in particular the prized Acacia trees, which they used to burn for charcoal as their main source of fuel. This has helped reduce the environmentally destructive effects of charcoal burning. A tool to withstand drought and boost animal production A total of 3 200 people benefited from the project, 2 480 people took part through the cash for work scheme, 570 people through unconditional cash transfers, and 100 traders and 50 representatives from local universities were trained on the uses and value of the tree’s by-products. As an immediate result, local people were able to use the milled pods for both animal and human consumption during the dry season, enabling them to better withstand the impacts of drought. Moreover, animals yielded more meat and milk in the dry season when they consumed prosopis by products. This decreased reliance on animal feeds and foodstuffs purchased from local markets has increased people’s savings. Women’s participation Women and youth have particularly benefited from the new business opportunities related to prosopis. Through the utilization of prosopis products, nine cooperative groups were established, out of which five have been able to make their businesses profitable and self-sustaining. “Local women’s associations have proved to be effective actors in spreading awareness and establishing commercial activities that utilize prosopis,” says Keino. Local people who have long feared and dreaded this alien tree species have now developed a better understanding of it, and see the potential to make good use of prosopis to enhance and sustain rural livelihoods affected by drought and climate change. “The prosopis tree has turned from a useless tree to a tree with many uses, something that had never crossed our minds,” says Abdullahi happily. Resilience Initiative The work to maximize prosopis opportunities continues through the joint FAO-WFP Resilience Initiative funded by Canada. Through this Initiative, two fodder processing facilities were built in 2019 in Beerato and Ceelxume village. “They will accommodate a variety of fodder processing machines to process prosopis pods into animal feed, including heavy duty hammer mills, feed choppers, mixer and pellet machines and feed block formation machines,” says Abdideeq Yusuf, Animal Health Officer, FAO. One-hundred and twenty people from Beerato village have collected and dried 3.6 tonnes of prosopis pods, which will be processed between September and November 2020. This quantity of pods, when mixed with other feed ingredients, is sufficient to feed 1 000 small ruminants (sheep or goats) for one month. They will also participate in capacity building activities on prosopis animal feed production, leading to the increased production and utilization of the plant. advertisements   UNDP’s new weather app helps Somali pastoralists - Borgen Mag Museveni commissions multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory - New Vision AMISOM hosts Somali Public Agenda to discuss Somalia’s 2020/2021 elections - AMISOM Somali chef Hawa Hassan tells stories of East African cuisine through the experts: grandmothers - Star Tribune Ahead of elections, UN urges that Somalia's political space remain open to all - UNSOM US embassy in Turkey warns of potential terror attack threat in Istanbul - CNN

UNDP’s new weather app helps Somali pastoralists

Saturday October 24, 2020 By Sarah Litchney Photo: Flickr SEATTLE, Washington — The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Somali Government invested $10 million in an app that helps Somalis prepare for extreme weather changes occurring in their area. In recent years, Somalia has experienced rapid floods followed by droughts that have affected rural communities, especially Somali pastoralists. UNDP’s new app is the first of its kind in Sub-Saharan Africa and is aiding Somali pastoralists and citizens alike. Somali Pastoralists and Weather Disasters Pastoralists require the right amount of rain to create grazing areas for livestock. Beyond cattle, pastoralists do not have any other means of obtaining money. In Somalia, 60% of the population are pastoralists. Water management is essential in Somalia because of multiple droughts in the area. From 2010 to 2012, 260,000 people died because of severe droughts in Somalia. Water shortage is also a significant challenge for Somali pastoralists, as well as Sub-Saharan African citizens. The UNDP App: Aiding People Through Weather Disasters Ads By Google UNDP’s new app works through the use of satellites and weather stations. Once an extreme weather change is detected, mobile phones receive an alert about any dangers in the area. Despite the difficulty of obtaining mobile phones in Sub-Saharan Africa, a 2013 survey by Gallup and a U.S. federal agency, called the Broadcasting Board of Directors, concluded that seven out of 10 Somalis owned a cellular phone. Since phone coverage in Somalia is fairly vast, it is far easier to get important information to people through mobile apps. Moreover, approximately 50% of Somali pastoralists use cellular phones. As such, these essential alerts can quickly be sent to communities most affected by weather changes and its dangers. The app will also inform the pastoralists of immediate water sources during droughts. The App’s Effectiveness in Somalia Since some pastoralists do not have cellular phones, it can be difficult to warn them of weather conditions. Most of Somalia’s cellular services are centered in urban areas. As such, tracking pastoralists based on their nomadic lifestyle is a complicated task. However, UNDP’s initiative also provides pastoralists with essential skills, such as creating reservoirs to save water and assembling better tracking systems to look for extreme weather changes. Through gradual progress, UNDP and the Somali Government’s efforts led to fewer deaths in 2019. According to the government, the U.N. division’s efforts helped approximately 360,000 farmers and pastoralists. The Effects of Droughts and Extreme Weather Conditions If pastoralists cannot produce food from their cattle, it can persuade younger pastoralists to join terrorist organizations to meet basic necessities, such as shelter, food and water. Al-Shabaab, a militaristic terrorist group, has a large presence in Somalia because of poverty in rural areas. According to the 2012 Somalia Human Development Report, approximately 81% of Somalis live in poverty. The extreme weather conditions put Somalis at risk of taking part in terrorist activities due to a lack of resources and economic and food insecurity. Moreover, Somalia is not a significant contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, which influences extreme weather and climate events. Instead, the country is affected by the top global carbon dioxide contributors, including the United States, China, and India. The socio-economic conditions in Somalia may worsen if extreme weather changes continue in the area. This is a significant problem for Somalia’s economy and Somalis’ quality of life, as 75% of Somalis rely on stable weather for their jobs. Only about 25% of people in Somalia live in urban centers. Since Somalis are mostly pastoralists or farmers, rain seasons are especially critical for producing food. Looking Ahead The issue of extreme weather events adds to Somalia’s ongoing civil unrest and its weak government system. However, the UNDP hopes that these new resources will help disadvantaged communities prepare for extreme weather changes and save cattle from floods or droughts. Somalis are already using the app on a trial run to figure out where to direct cattle in times of drought. Despite the prevalent digital divide, the trial run has shown that new technologies make it easier for nomadic people to find resources. The UNDP project will run for four years, providing rural communities with essential information and skills to better fight the extreme weather and climate changes. advertisements   Museveni commissions multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory - New Vision AMISOM hosts Somali Public Agenda to discuss Somalia’s 2020/2021 elections - AMISOM Somali chef Hawa Hassan tells stories of East African cuisine through the experts: grandmothers - Star Tribune Ahead of elections, UN urges that Somalia's political space remain open to all - UNSOM US embassy in Turkey warns of potential terror attack threat in Istanbul - CNN

Museveni commissions multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory

Saturday October 24, 2020 The President said that countries that have fully achieved their economic growth built their base on the principle factors of production. Amina Hersi (C), proprietor of Atiak Sugar Factory, guides President Museveni and others on a tour of the mega facility shortly after its commissioning on Thursday, October 22, 2020. (PPU) AMURU - President Yoweri Museveni has commissioned the multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory in Amuru district.It is located in Atiak sub-county, Kilak county, 85km from Gulu City on Gulu-Nimule road.The colourful ceremony on Thursday (October 22, 2020) was witnessed by both Uganda and Somali top government officials, including Somalia's First Lady Saynab Abdi Moallim. Ads By Google The President said that countries that have fully achieved their economic growth built their base on the principle factors of production including land, labour, capital and entrepreneurship."Uganda as a developing country is still lacking three elements; capital and knowledge added to entrepreneurship skills to develop further. My people in Uganda, if you want Uganda to develop, you must have these factors. Ensure that the natural resources - land, minerals, forests, rivers among others - are exploited," he said.It was established after a feasibility study, that sugarcane can grow in the area, way back in 2016 under the initiative of Amina Morghe Hersi, a Somali entrepreneur, who together invested in it with Uganda Development Corporation (UDC) that possesses 40% of total investment.In May 2018, the government of Uganda, through UDC, took a 10.1% ownership in Atiak Sugar Factory, for an investment of sh20b (approximately US$5.5m)."It is true Uganda has some entrepreneurship capacity but it is not enough. Therefore, capital, entrepreneurship and knowledge should be adopted to add on what is available to develop like other countries," said Museveni.He cautioned Ugandans against claiming that  foreign investments belong to foreigners and not Ugandans."Investments on Ugandan land belong to Ugandans, not the investors, because the citizens are the prime beneficiaries through employment opportunities, taxation that promotes national economic growth, etc." 'Amina does not give up'President Museveni saluted Amina for her vision of starting sugarcane growing in northern Uganda, hence the Atiak sugar factory."It has added sugar capacity as a commodity for internal consumption and export alongside Kakira, Kinyara and Lugazi factories. Amina is a freedom fighter like Museveni because she does not give up," he said.He thanked the people of Atiak for embracing the investment and called on those who were against the investment to join them."Let those who have been confusing us come and join us. We respect them. We shall receive them."Prior to the commissioning ceremony, the President was taken on guided tour of the factory covering 15.1km across the sugarcane plantation to the banks of River Aswa, where a bridge will be built across the river to ease transportation of sugarcane to the factory from across the neighboring districts.Abid Mohamud, an official at the factory, told the President that when the sugarcane growing had just kicked off, the production of canes was 20 tonnes, but with the application of chemicals and fertilizers, the production has increased more than two-fold - to 45 tonnes. The Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Jacob Oulanyah, referred to President Museveni as a great hunter whose idea has taken shape successfully."Mr. President, you had a vision, knowing what works and what does not work. This is a success of an idea that has taken shape and transformed the area," he said.Trade State minister Michael Werikhe Kafabusa said they are committed to work with Atiak Sugar Factory and the UDC management to ensure economic transformation.On her part, Amina, the proprietor, said this is a clear testimony of economic transformation in Africa."The war times in the minds of the people in the area will be put in the archives. Over 5,000 women are today beneficiaries of the factory by affirmative action.  A wealthy woman is a wealthy society and a wealthy nation," she said.She thanked the President for his support to the investment, saying that his dream has been achieved.  advertisements   UNDP’s new weather app helps Somali pastoralists - Borgen Mag AMISOM hosts Somali Public Agenda to discuss Somalia’s 2020/2021 elections - AMISOM Somali chef Hawa Hassan tells stories of East African cuisine through the experts: grandmothers - Star Tribune Ahead of elections, UN urges that Somalia's political space remain open to all - UNSOM US embassy in Turkey warns of potential terror attack threat in Istanbul - CNN

Somali chef Hawa Hassan tells stories of East African cuisine through the experts: grandmothers

By Sharyn Jackson  Saturday October 24, 2020 Local "bibi" among those featured in the new cookbook.  Ma Halima is a Minneapolis “grandma” featured in Hawa Hassan’s book “In Bibi’s Kitchen.”PHOTO BY KHADIJA M. FARAH AND JENNIFER MAY Hawa Hassan clears something up right away in her first cookbook, “In Bibi’s Kitchen.” The book is “not about what is new and next,” she writes in the introduction, a daring departure for a food entrepreneur and recipe developer whose YouTube videos garner hundreds of thousands of views. Instead, Hassan decided to go back, way back, to the kitchen wisdom of grandmothers. Ads By Google “In Bibi’s Kitchen,” which Hassan co-authored with Julia Turshen, is a primer on the dishes that originate in the African countries bordering the Indian Ocean, from Eritrea to South Africa, as seen through the lens of the matriarchs who pass those recipes down from generation to generation. “I want to preserve the stories that have always preserved me,” Hassan said in an interview. “I want to pay homage to the people who’ve taken care of me, and I want to share our food with people.” But sharing the food of eight countries that hug thousands of miles of coastline was a daunting task for the founder and CEO of Basbaas Sauce, a line of Somali condiments. So, she turned to the experts: 16 bibis (that’s Swahili for grandmother) with a combined “gazillion” years of experience, who share their stories and cooking techniques in interviews at the start of every chapter. “I kept wondering why grandmothers were being left out of the narrative,” Hassan said about the framework for her book. “Why was no one speaking to grandmothers anywhere? Why was it that when men traveled far away to countries where women were the people who sustained cultures and kept recipes, why were they not being spoken to on TV?” “In Bibi’s Kitchen” invites readers and home cooks to trace the influences of geography and natural resources, religion and culture, and trade and colonialism on East African countries’ signature flavors. Part of Somalia, for example, was an Italian colony, and Hassan has included a recipe for spaghetti sauce that’s infused with coriander, cardamom, cinnamon, cumin, cloves, black pepper and turmeric — the spices that comprise the essential Somali blend called Xawaash. The chapter on Somalia, where Hassan was born, naturally led her to a bibi in Minneapolis, which is home to the largest Somali population in the United States. Ma Halima (Ma is an honorific) was born in Ethiopia and raised in Somalia and Saudi Arabia before emigrating to Minnesota, where she at one time owned a restaurant. She contributed two recipes to “In Bibi’s Kitchen,” one for the flatbread Sabaayad, and another for Beef Suqaar, a kind of stir-fry of meat with vegetables. “Ma Halima embodies the essence of a Somali woman in that she is vocal, she’s lively, she’s inclusive, she was somebody who had traveled a great deal and she was willing to share that,” Hassan said about meeting her interview subject, who is shown in the book wearing bright yellow and holding a platter of food. Giving others a voice A former model, it was important to Hassan to share the spotlight with these oft-overlooked women, especially on a topic that has also been desperately overlooked in the publishing world. There’s a lack of cookbooks about African cuisine, and the reason is obvious, she said. “There are not enough of us in the rooms where these decisions are being made. It means that the audience is not being served in the best way that they can be served, and that they’re not having introductions into others’ cultures.” But Hassan wasn’t comfortable being a lone voice tasked with amplifying a continent’s cuisine. “It’s not my job to tell the whole story,” she said. “That’s why it’s really important to make sure that other people have the room to tell it themselves.” Born in Mogadishu during civil war, Hassan fled with her family to a refugee camp in Kenya, staying there for three years until she was resettled — without her family — in Seattle. It took 15 years for her to reunite with her mother and siblings, who had gone on to live in Norway. Going back and forth from New York City, where she was modeling, to Oslo, Hassan immersed herself in her family’s culture while learning to cook Somali food. Using her mother’s recipes as a jumping off point, Hassan founded Basbaas in 2015. Her jarred sauces — tamarind-date and cilantro-coconut — can be ordered online (basbaassauce.com). Hassan, 34, hopes to one day sell her sauces in stores in Minnesota, a state with a flourishing Somali food culture. There at least 65 Somali restaurants here, possibly many more, said Osman Ali, founder of the Somali Museum of Minnesota. The richness of the community amazes Hassan every time she visits (she has a cousin in St. Louis Park). “Every time I go there, I’m so shocked at how deeply rooted the Somalis are with one another, how Somalis migrate to a place all together. I’m like, did everyone telephone home and say ‘I’m moving to Minnesota?’ ” Hassan said, laughing. “I’ll meet young people and they’re like, ‘Oh, I was living in Boston and then I moved to Minnesota for community.’ That is really interesting to me.” Especially compared to New York, where Hassan lives, and where the Somali community is harder to come by. “I don’t see that here,” she said. “You have to be really intentional if you’re going to hang out with Somali friends.” Erasing stigmas While growing up in the U.S., Hassan felt a need to “humanize” her homeland for Americans. “I spent a good amount of my life as a young kid in Seattle defending not just Somalia, but Africa, because the idea of Africa was always starvation and destitution and hunger and war, and I was like, that’s not real. That’s not my Africa that I know.” Now with her cookbook, she’s using the food of Somalia and that of neighboring countries to destigmatize those still-lingering impressions. “The way that I share food is to dismantle that narrative,” she said. And helping her accomplish that goal are the bibis, from Comoros and Tanzania to Madagascar and Mozambique. “Elders are an important source of information,” said Ali, who owned a Somali restaurant in Minneapolis for nine years. “As people moved from nomadic society to the cities, moved again and emigrated to another country, they had to learn [to cook] from there again. Elders can talk about what they were using,” and can fill in their descendants on customs that might have otherwise been lost, he said. “In Bibi’s Kitchen” preserves, in print, foods that when tasted or smelled, send Hassan right back to the comfort of her mother’s kitchen. Like the Italian-influenced and yet unmistakably Somali pasta sauce. That dish is “what has sustained me all these years,” she said, served with a side of banana — a pairing of two “rock stars.” While the food of Africa is not a singular story that one person could — or even should — tell, Hassan hopes her own passion for the flavors of East Africa, and for the grandmothers who help those dishes endure, will be a gateway for people who want to learn more. “My goal is to always talk from the space I occupy,” she said. “I’m Black, I’m Somali, I’m Muslim-raised, I’m a girl from Seattle, I’m a girl from Kenya — there are these many layers to me. So all I can do is share that and hope that at some point, whatever table I build, people have the audacity to sit down.” @SharynJackson Get a taste of East Africa Here’s where Somali chef Hawa Hassan eats East African food when she visits Minneapolis: SAFARI EXPRESS The groundbreaking Somali restaurant by brothers Jamal and Sade Hashi, beloved for the camel burger, is a longtime vendor at Midtown Global Market. 920 E. Lake St., Mpls., 612-874-0756, safaritogo.net. AFRO DELI With outposts in both Minneapolis and St. Paul, Abdirahman Kahin’s restaurants fuse East African, Mediterranean and American-influenced cuisines. 720 Washington Av. SE., Mpls., 612-871-5555; 5 W. 7th Place, St. Paul, 651-888-2186, skyway locations temporarily closed. afrodeli.com. advertisements   UNDP’s new weather app helps Somali pastoralists - Borgen Mag Museveni commissions multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory - New Vision AMISOM hosts Somali Public Agenda to discuss Somalia’s 2020/2021 elections - AMISOM Ahead of elections, UN urges that Somalia's political space remain open to all - UNSOM US embassy in Turkey warns of potential terror attack threat in Istanbul - CNN

Ahead of elections, UN urges that Somalia's political space remain open to all

Saturday October 24, 2020 Mogadishu – As Somalia prepares to hold elections, the United Nations today highlighted the need to ensure the country’s political space remains open, allowing for a diversity of voices and views to be expressed as part of the democratic process. To achieve this, freedom of expression, opinion, and assembly must be protected. Ads By Google “A vibrant political space is one that permits and encourages the participation of all segments of society – individual citizens, the media, civil society, public institutions, and political parties, among others.  A democratic society must allow different viewpoints on political issues to be expressed openly, free from restriction or harassment,” said the UN Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Somalia, James Swan. “Somalia has made progress on governance reforms in recent years, and now it is imperative to expand political space further as the country prepares for elections. It is particularly important that the voices of historically marginalized groups be heard,” he added. “Democracy is more than the holding of elections; it also means ensuring a country’s political space allows for the participation of all in public life.” The United Nations in Somalia notes that freedom of expression, opinion, and assembly are core democratic values enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Provisional Constitution of Somalia. The United Nations stands ready to work with Somali authorities and civil society to protect and expand Somalia’s political space.  advertisements   The invasive prosopis tree: turning a livelihood menace into a source of income in Somaliland - FAO UNDP’s new weather app helps Somali pastoralists - Borgen Mag Museveni commissions multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory - New Vision AMISOM hosts Somali Public Agenda to discuss Somalia’s 2020/2021 elections - AMISOM Somali chef Hawa Hassan tells stories of East African cuisine through the experts: grandmothers - Star Tribune US embassy in Turkey warns of potential terror attack threat in Istanbul - CNN

US embassy in Turkey warns of potential terror attack threat in Istanbul

Saturday October 24, 2020The US consulate in Istanbul, pictured in July 2016. (CNN)—The US Mission in Turkey issued a warning to American citizens Friday of a potential terror attack threat in Istanbul and elsewhere in the country. The US Mission "has received credible reports of potential terrorist attacks and kidnappings against US citizens and foreign nationals in Istanbul, including against the US Consulate General, as well as potentially other locations in Turkey," according to a security alert issued Friday. Ads By Google The alert urged US citizens "to exercise heightened caution in locations where Americans or foreigners may gather, including large office buildings or shopping malls." A State Department spokesperson declined to provide further details on the specific threat, noting that "the statement speaks for itself." "The U.S. Mission to Turkey issued this notice as a result of ongoing assessment of security conditions," the spokesperson said. "We are grateful for the support of the Turkish government in ensuring the safety of U.S. citizens living in Turkey as well as Turkish citizens who visit our Embassy and Consulates." They said that "the information used to formulate Alerts is collected from a range of sources, such as crime statistics and other publicly-available information, information gathered from U.S. government sources, as well as assessments by our embassies and consulates." "Alerts also take into account decisions made to protect the security of U.S. government personnel overseas and ensure that U.S. citizens receive appropriate security information," the spokesperson said, adding that they "represent our commitment to protect U.S. citizens traveling and residing abroad by providing them important safety and security information."  advertisements   The invasive prosopis tree: turning a livelihood menace into a source of income in Somaliland - FAO UNDP’s new weather app helps Somali pastoralists - Borgen Mag Museveni commissions multibillion-shilling Atiak Sugar Factory - New Vision AMISOM hosts Somali Public Agenda to discuss Somalia’s 2020/2021 elections - AMISOM Somali chef Hawa Hassan tells stories of East African cuisine through the experts: grandmothers - Star Tribune Ahead of elections, UN urges that Somalia's political space remain open to all - UNSOM

Sudan to normalize ties with Israel, leave U.S. list of terrorism sponsors

U.S. President Donald Trump announced Friday that Sudan will start to normalize ties with Israel, making it the third Arab state to do so as part of U.S.-brokered deals in the run-up to the Nov. 3 election.

'Boogaloo Bois' member charged in connection to shooting at Minneapolis police station

Federal prosecutors charged a far-right extremist in connection with a shooting at a Minneapolis police station during protests sparked by George Floyd's killing, authorities said Friday.

Igad issues alert over ageing tanker abandoned in the Red Sea

The Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (Igad) has expressed concern over the potential environmental disaster posed to the Red Sea by the FSO Safer, an aging oil tanker moored off the western coast of Yemen.

New Djibouti sea route to reduce shipping time between Turkey, Horn of Africa from 50 days to 10

Friday October 23, 2020 The first container ship of the Djibouti Shipping Company, which will exclusively operate between Turkey, Djibouti and Somalia, was launched during a ceremony on Friday. The new sea route will reduce shipping time from 35 to 50 days to just nine to 10 days, Djibouti’s Ambassador to Turkey Aden Houssein Abdillahi stated.“This new logistics initiative, which enables to deliver goods in nine to 10 days instead of 35 to 50 days is a game-changer that will increase the trade volume between Turkey and the Horn of Africa,” Abdillahi said. Ads By Google Saying that it will substantially increase financial cooperation, the ambassador stated: “The new shipping line established by the Djibouti shipping company will operate exclusively between Turkey and the Horn of Africa with two container ships with the capacity of 11,000 tons and 20,000 tons, respectively.”The ambassador pointed out that this represents a huge opportunity in reducing transportation time and saves on cost.Reiterating that around 90% of the world’s imports and exports are transported by sea, the ambassador stated that the high cost of sea transportation is a real challenge for Africa. “It creates logistical costs damaging African producers and disrupting supply chains and plays a role in the purchasing power of the African consumer,” he elaborated.The ambassador stated that the trade volume between Turkey and Africa was constantly increasing. “Though we came a long way until today, it is not enough,” he stated.While the trade volume between Turkey and the Horn of Africa, namely Djibouti, Ethiopia and Somalia, totaled $518.24 million (TL 4.127 billion) in 2015, it reached $846.46 million in 2019.“As transportation is an essential parameter to improve commercial and economic relations, we are convinced that with the new route and the commitment of our both governments and private sectors, we will reach $1.5 billion by 2021,” he said.Speaking to Daily Sabah, Abdillahi pointed out that the first container ship began to operate 2 1/2 months ago, while a second one was added.“What we expect from Turkey is making things easier for businesspeople from Djibouti and Somalia,” he underlined. The ambassador explained that most are complaining about financial services and residency permits rather than transportation services. “When a businessman is coming here, opening offices, employing people and selling goods to the Horn of Africa, every year they have to line up for paperwork,” he said, adding that facilitating these processes was of high importance.Can Incesu, coordinator of the Turkey-Africa partnership in the Turkish Foreign Ministry, stated that Turkey has strong ties with the countries of the Horn of Africa and embassies in all three countries.“Turkey attaches the utmost importance to the establishment of peace, security and stability of the region. The economic growth of this region is also of critical importance,” he said, adding that this shipping route will inevitably increase the trade volume.Fuat Kasımcan of the Turkish Trade Ministry during the event pointed out that a 10% cost reduction in maritime trade increases trade by 6%-8%, while logistic efficiency is also reflected in the gross domestic product (GDP).Turkey's opening up to Africa, which dates back to the Action Plan adopted in 1988, took shape in 2005. Since then, the country has focused on comprehensive, long-term policies based on diversifying its relations with the continent. In that sense, the fields of agriculture, water resource management, rural development, health, micro-macro enterprises and security have played pivotal roles in Turkey's economic transactions with Africa.Relations between Africa and Turkey gained momentum when the first Turkey-Africa Cooperation Summit was held in the commercial capital Istanbul with the participation of representatives from 50 African countries in 2008 and the second summit being held in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea in 2014. Turkey has 42 Turkish embassies in African countries. advertisements   Waddani party leader Abdirahman Irro tests positive for COVID19 - HOL Minnesota COVID survivor goes home after 208 days of hospitalization - WCCO Minneosta counts 20 more deaths from COVID-19 - HOL Tanzania hit by recent IS attack near Mozambique border - AFP Museveni meets Somalia's First Lady - New Vision Students of color lead push for equity in Minnesota schools - MPR News The UAE’s Military Training-Focused Foreign Policy - CEIP 33 Indian workers held hostage by Somalia firm - The Print

Waddani party leader Abdirahman Irro tests positive for COVID19

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Golaha Shacabka oo qorshe halis ah u diyaarsaday Wasiirada RW Rooble & Go’aankooda oo..

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